Reverend Horton Heat, The Buttertones, The Paladins, special guest Deke Dickerson – Tickets – House of Blues – San Diego – San Diego, CA – January 19th, 2020

Reverend Horton Heat, The Buttertones, The Paladins, special guest Deke Dickerson

Casbah and Live Nation present

Reverend Horton Heat

The Buttertones

The Paladins

special guest Deke Dickerson

Sun, January 19, 2020

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

House of Blues - San Diego

San Diego, CA

$25 adv/$30 day of show

This event is all ages

Reverend Horton Heat
Reverend Horton Heat
Mad, Mad Heart
Loaded .38s, space heaters, and big skies. Welcome to the lethal, littered landscape of Jim Heath's imagination. True to his high evangelical calling, Jim is a Revelator, both revealing & reinterpreting the country-blues-rock roots of American music. He's a time-travelling space-cowboy on an endless interstellar musical tour, and we are all the richer and "psychobillier" for getting to tag along.

Seeing REVEREND HORTON HEAT live is a transformative experience. Flames come off the guitars. Heat singes your skin. There's nothing like the primal tribal rock 'n roll transfiguration of a Reverend Horton Heat show. Jim becomes a slicked-back 1950?s rock 'n roll shaman channeling Screamin' Jay Hawkins through Buddy Holly, while Jimbo incinerates the Stand-Up Bass. And then there are the "Heatettes". Those foxy rockabilly chicks dressed in poodle-skirts and cowboy boots slamming the night away. It's like being magically transported into a Teen Exploitation picture from the 1950s that's currently taking place in the future.

Listening to the REVEREND HORTON HEAT is tantamount to injecting pure musical nitrous into the hot-rod engine of your heart. The Reverend's commandants are simple. Rock hard, drive fast, and live true. And no band on this, or any other, planet rocks harder, drives faster, or lives truer than the Reverend Horton Heat. These itinerant preachers actually practice what they preach. They live their lives by the Gospel of Rock 'n Roll.

From the High-Octane Spaghetti-Western Wall of Sound in "Big Sky" to the dark driving frenetic paranoia of "400 Bucks" to the brain-melting Western Psychedelic Garage purity of "Psychobilly Freakout" The Rev's music is the perfect soundtrack to the Drive-In Movie of your life.

Jim Heath and Jimbo Wallace have chewed up more road than the Google Maps drivers. For twenty-five Psychobilly years, they have blazed an indelible, unforgettable, and meteoric trail across the globe with their unique blend of musical virtuosity, legendary showmanship, and mythic imagery.

The 11th studio album from REVEREND HORTON HEAT, boldly titled Rev, released on January 21st, 2014, stands as the bands highest charting album in their 25-year career. Debuting on Billboard?s Top 200 Albums Chart at #111, Top Current Albums Chart at #104, #26 on the Independent Albums Chart, and #2 on the Heatseekers Chart, Rolling Stone called REV "a throwback to old-school psychobilly-style Horton Heat" and "13 tracks of pure psychobilly mayhem" by Guitar World.

On tour forever, don't miss the Godfathers of Psychobilly, REVEREND HORTON HEAT at Coachella Music Festival this year!

"Okay it's time for me to put this loaded gun down, jump in my Five-Oh Ford, and nurture my pig on the outskirts of Houston. I'll be bringing my love whip. See y'all later." - Carty Talkington Writer/Director
The Buttertones
The Buttertones
The Buttertones’ Gravedigging is more a movie waiting to happen than an album—or a soundtrack just waiting to inspire a movie, with scene after scene of action, tension and release set to a sound that takes everything good and true about American music before the Beatles prettied it up (surf, sweet soul, the boss saxophone-overdrive garage of the Northwest wailers like the Sonics) and matches it to punk energy, post-punk precision and the kind of personality that blows the circuit-breakers at a backyard party. (Which actually happened, of course.) They’ve even got casting suggestions if anyone wants to start filming—like Willem DeFoe, Winona Ryder, Lucy Liu, and Tommy Wiseau in as many roles as possible. Says guitarist Dakota Boettcher: “We all love movies so much. When you listen to a soundtrack, it has peaks and it has lows, but it’s a whole journey. That’s what we want to do. We want you to go on a journey.”
The Buttertones started their own journey in 2011 as three music school misfits (or drinking buddies, they say) in the heart of Hollywood, happy to learn how to to play, produce and perform but less excited about frequent go-nowhere conversations with classmates who had little interest in either the past or the future of music. So that’s why bassist Sean Redman (also a former member of Cherry Glazerr) felt like he’d lucked out when he found guitarist/singer Richard Araiza and drummer/polyinstrumentalist Modesto ‘Cobi’ Cobiån: “Cobi and Richard were the first guys I met where I thought they knew what they were talking about,” he says. “They had good influences—they weren’t just trying to pander.”

Their first rehearsals were in a Hollywood bedroom where Redman was living on an air mattress, then Araiza finally locked down Boettcher—who he’d often see responding to the same casting calls as he did—to replace another guitarist who was transitioning back to family life even as the Buttertones prepared their debut release, a self-titled cassette on L.A.’s garage-pop Lolipop label. Then they absorbed sax player London Guzmån (formerly in Long Beach’s Wild Pack of Canaries with breakout local Rudy De Anda) after spotting him at a local DJ night, recruiting him for their sophomore album American Brunch—and discovering the kind chemistry they didn't know they were missing. Says Araiza: “We’re proud to be a legit band. It’s a very collaborative process—we rely on each other. I feel that’s rare nowadays, especially with rock bands.”

When it came time to make Gravedigging—the follow-up to a special issue 8” for Innovative, which ended up pulling them aboard the label full-time—they knew it was time to go deeper and get dirtier. Recorded at Jazzcats studio in Long Beach—home-away-from-home to fellow Innovative Leisure artists Hanni El Khatib, Tijuana Panthers, Wall of Death and more—in the spring of 2016, the sessions were supercharged with hard-won live experience from endless street-level shows and relentless midnight-to-six rehearsals at the Buttertones lock-out, then focused even further by the insight and vision of producer Jonny Bell. (“Jonny pushed us like crazy,” says Boettcher. “He had so many ideas all he time.”)

It kicks off with “Pistol Whip” and “Sadie’s A Sadist,” twin tales of love and crime that match outré Dangerhouse Records punk (the dirty surf of the Alleycats, the slash-and-burn sax of the Deadbeats) to an urgent rock ‘n’ roll rhythm section and lyrics about what happens when you get into something you can’t get out of. “Neon Cowboy” is a weird-Western Wall of Voodoo take on that expansive Ennio Morricone soundtrack sound, then “I Ran Away” is heartbroken East Side Story sweet soul and “Geisha’s Gaze” is a sleazy popcorn-style R&B slow burner. It’s zig-zag through the wild parts of music—the kind of road trip that Iggy Pop was on in Repo Man or the kind where Lux Interior picked up Poison Ivy hitchhiking—and it ends with a climax and a cliffhanger both. That's the nervous-but-nasty title track “Gravediggin’,” a pedal-to-the-metal instrumental that goes blasting over the edge of the world into a dazed slow-mo fade, with just enough time between freefall and impact for Araiza to sing, “I've been treading my way through another haze / Tossed my heart to the wind …” Think of it this way: you might not yet know how the band that made Gravediggin’ is going to land—but you know it’s going to hit hard.
The Paladins
The Paladins
The Paladins started out as a rockabilly band during the rockabilly craze of the early 1980s. Their tagline at the time was "Western & Bop", as they played a combination of rockabilly and vintage country. Their lead singer and rhythm guitarist was Whit Broadly. With this lineup they did their first recording, a contribution to a 1982 local compilation album, Who's Listening?, and a song two years later on The Best of L.A. Rockabilly, a 1984 Rhino Records LP. Their first LP, The Paladins, was produced by Kim Wilson of the Fabulous Thunderbirds and was released in 1987 on Wrestler Records.[1] Their second album, Years Since Yesterday, produced by Los Lobos' Steve Berlin and Mark Linnet, was released on Alligator Records in 1989 and had sold more than 20,000 copies by the end of the year; the band shot a music video for the title song at the Belly Up Tavern in Solana Beach, California for $30,000.[2] Spending most of their time on the road, by 1989 they had already toured with Stevie Ray Vaughan, Los Lobos, The Blasters and the Fabulous Thunderbirds.[1] They toured abroad as well; in the summer of 1989, between recording sessions for the third album, they played in Europe for the month of June, including shows at the Peer Music Festival in Belgium and the World Music Festival in London.[3]
1990s[edit]

In 1990 the Paladins released their third record, Let's Buzz, "an invigorating blend of rockabilly, blues, rhythm-and-blues and country" recorded in the Los Angeles studio of 1970s soul star Leon Haywood (who also played keyboards on the album), produced again by Steve Berlin and Mark Linnet[4] and released by Alligator.[5] Acclaim came with a nomination at the 1990 Entertainer Music Awards (San Diego County) for Best Rock 'n' Roll, Original Music, for which they were a critics' favorite (they lost out to Beat Farmers).[6] They won the award two years later,[7] a year after winning the San Diego Music Awards.[8] Touring continued relentlessly at home and abroad; in 1991, for instance, they toured Australia for three weeks.[9] Shows were reviewed as fun, lively performances where band members would solo, swap instruments and even occasionally encourage audience members to play instruments.[10]
2000s[edit]

The Paladins appeared to have come to an end in 2004 when Gonzalez wanted to focus on different musical interests after having formed the Hacienda Brothers.[11][12] Thereafter a number of live albums and a live DVD were released with the band sometimes described as being "on hiatus."[13]
While touring with his current band, the Stone River Boys, Gonzalez joined Yearsly and Brian Fahey at the Ink & Iron Festival in Long Beach, California in June 2011 for a Paladins reunion concert, the band's first US concert since 2005.
2013- The Pals have a brand new release called "Wicked". The band recorded a 45RPM Vinyl, @ Thunderbird Analog Recording Studio by: Thomas Yearsley and its being released on LUX Records! The band is up and touring again, so keep your eyes out for The Paladins coming to your City!
Venue Information:
House of Blues - San Diego
1055 5th Ave.
San Diego, CA, 92101