Night Beats, Cosmonauts – Tickets – The Casbah – San Diego – San Diego, CA – April 20th, 2019

Night Beats, Cosmonauts

Casbah presents

Night Beats, Cosmonauts

Cosmonauts, Wild Wild Wets

Sat, April 20, 2019

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:30 pm

The Casbah - San Diego

San Diego, CA

$15.00 - $18.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is 21 and over

Night Beats
Night Beats
Night Beats - Myth Of A Man

Myth Of A Man is a reckoning, a shoot-out at dawn, the ear-splitting peel-out that leaves nothing but a cloud of red dust in its wake. It marks a new era for Night Beats and its frontman, Danny Lee Blackwell—an era marked by independence, expansion, and undiscovered facets of an undeniable talent.

The outlaw rumble and screeching guitar of “Eyes On Me” offer the familiar garage groove of the Night Beats sound, but the lyrics reveal a pivotal shift. “Will I rise or will I fall / Crash against the canyon wall / Give the people what they came to see / Everybody’s eyes / On me,” Blackwell sings. The song may have been inspired by a failed Evel Knievel jump, but it’s Blackwell himself that seems to be poised at the edge of Snake River Canyon, a lone figure against the dusty ridge and setting sun, staring down both doom and glory.

While Blackwell has always fed off the musical legacy of his Texas roots—Roky Erickson and the 13th Floor Elevators, The Red Krayola, The Black Angels and more paving the way for the napalm-coated psych-rock headtrip of past albums—Myth Of A Man has him pulling from the surrogate wellspring of Nashville, Tennessee. It was there that he worked with the eminent Dan Auerbach, and a murderer’s row of battle-worn session musicians—the combined weight of experience that comes from working with every legend from Aretha Franklin to Elvis not lost on Blackwell. “I was just humbled by being accepted,” he explains, “Big hearts all around.”

With an arsenal of both Auerbach and the seasoned vets, Blackwell was eager to collaborate, their expertise and studied ears opening his songs up to new sonic directions. “There was definitely a conscious decision to expand and try things differently,” Blackwell explains, “I try to push against a brick wall all the time.” You can hear the sound of Nashville creeping into the chorus of “Stand With Me”, in the triumphant, Glen Campbell strut of “There She Goes,” or even in the wounded, battered, and bourbon-soaked spirit of “(Am I Just) Wasting My Time,” a wistful take on bad romance that Blackwell might as well be singing to us from the lonely stool at the dark end of the bar.

The result is an album that’s less of the bloodshot acid trip of Sonic Bloom (2013) and Who Sold My Generation (2016) and more of the hazy comedown. The moody organ comps and slow stroll of the 12-string on “Her Cold Cold Heart” evoke the noxious feeling and hypnotic state of toxic love, the spirit of Bill Withers is flowing through the acoustic guitar and sun-soaked shuffle of “I Wonder,” and string-trimmed ballads like “Footprints” and “Too Young To Pray” evoke the imaginative, cowboy psychedelia of fellow Texan, Lee Hazlewood. “Let Me Guess” with its searing riff and Elevators-esque organ assures us that the scuzzy sound we know and love is alive and well, while “One Thing,” a song about being used and abused—or as Blackwell sharply puts it, “being rolled up and smoked”—has plenty of fuzzed-out guitars to let us know he might just be happy about it.

Written during a particularly destructive period of the band, the album is populated by fallen angels, blood-sucking wanderers, and vindictive lovers—sketches of people the band has surely come across during their cosmic roving through the underground—but the character most present is Blackwell, himself. “Myth Of A Man can be summed up as a personal display of vulnerability and guilty conscience,” he explains, “Destroying the mythos of what it means to live and function in society.” With its bold steps forward, Myth Of A Man serves as both a takedown and reintroduction of the band as we know it—the strongest evidence that you’ll never be able to pin Night Beats down.
Cosmonauts
Cosmonauts
"Their raucous set was like if the Velvet Underground had turned to the MC5 at their Boston Tea Party concert in 1968 and, instead of insulting them, had turned and made love to them—and that was how Lou Reed wound up wearing that dog collar. I couldn't make out a single lyric, but did they really close the set with 'Little Honda?'" --LA RECORD

"Swirling, distorted psych, bulldozed along by pounding primitive drums, fuzzed out vocals, all glued together with a heavy spaced out guitar drone. If that ain't the ingredients for record of the month my name is Prince Bloody William. Imagine if you will the best of THEE OH SEES jamming deep with MOON DUO, with the aid of some sort of retro type drug that only Brace Belden knows the name of and you would almost be right on the money. Heavy, without losing one single hook, repetitive without being the least bit boring and shamelessly stepped in the glory years of acid rock without being a boring regurgitating hipster. Be warned, this record will give you a contact high." --Maximum Rock N Roll #337
Wild Wild Wets
Wild Wild Wets
Wild Wild Wets was founded in 2011 by three former members of the Old In Out, who had recently split; Mike Turi (Trap Gold), Marco Salvatore Piro (Vinyl Film), and Ryan White (aka Ryan Vincent Bohan). They were joined by singer/keyboardist Priscilla Castro and bassist Taejon Romanik (Dark Thirty, Jeans Wilder). Piro and White/Bohan were only with the Old In Out during its final few months.

"We're a party psychedelic rock band," says Piro. "We're trying to make it an experience. Anyone can start a band and have five people on stage playing their hearts out, but we wanted to add something more for the concertgoer."

Turi cites the Penetrators (New York's, not San Diego's) as a top influence. He and Bohan also have a side band called Trap Gold, founded in 2010 along with Kelly Sullivan and synth-bassist Chase Elliott (the Kabbs). Former Old In Out guitarist Rory Truesdale launched a solo project called Sleeping Ghost/Electric Crush.

In concert, the group is often accompanied by projection artist, John Kelley. "It's Mikey's vision," Piro says of the band. "It's his world that he's created. He's very Andy Warhol-esqe, but not all weird in the bad way. He's a very creative person, a doer, an artist, and one of the best painters I've ever met. He's a multifaceted individual. So he's like the good parts of Warhol, but not a pervert or any of that shit."
Venue Information:
The Casbah - San Diego
2501 Kettner Blvd.
San Diego, CA, 92101
http://www.casbahmusic.com