Big Sandy and His Flyrite Boys, Wayne “The Train” Hancock – Tickets – The Casbah – San Diego – San Diego, CA – March 11th, 2017

Big Sandy and His Flyrite Boys, Wayne "The Train" Hancock

Casbah presents

Big Sandy and His Flyrite Boys

Wayne "The Train" Hancock

The Johnny Deadly Trio

Sat, March 11, 2017

Doors: 9:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

The Casbah - San Diego

San Diego, CA

$20.00 - $22.00

This event is 21 and over

Big Sandy and His Flyrite Boys
Big Sandy and His Flyrite Boys
Big Sandy is back! Back in the USA, that is. After having spent the better part of the last several months performing on festival stages and in sold-out concert venues throughout Europe, the big man of American roots music is elated to be back in The States, touring this Fall from the coast of California to the shores of Delaware Bay.

Over the last three decades, Big Sandy and his Fly-Rite Boys have kept up a constant cycle of traveling back and forth across the lower 48, then hopping across the pond to Europe and beyond. They bring with them a brand of American music that has earned them an induction into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame, several national television appearances, guest spots on The Grand Ole Opry, and a slew of adoring fans.
Wayne "The Train" Hancock
Wayne "The Train" Hancock
Wayne Hancock has been called "the master of hillbilly swing," a "roots Renaissance man," a "country singer's country singer" and "Hank Williams meets Gershwin." But the phrase most frequently echoed throughout his career is "Wayne Hancock is the real deal." Joe Ely said it, Hank Williams III said it, Bobby Koefer from the Texas Playboys said it, as have countless music fans and writers when referring to Hancock's authentic and original blend of honky tonk, western swing, blues and big band that he calls "juke joint swing!"

Authenticity and sincerity have been the cornerstones of Hancock's writing and music since the start of his career. His refusal to compromise his vision and sell out his music has earned him a fiercely loyal underground following. Hancock's vision, as he puts it, is "to bring people together and make them feel good about music. It's a spiritual thing and without spirituality, you've got nothin'. There ain't much on the radio that strikes me as being original or from the heart, most of it's from the pocketbook and it shows."

Wayne is proud of his rural roots and culture and has thoroughly absorbed the spirit of country music's forefathers such as Ernest Tubb, Hank Williams and Jimmie Rodgers. Never a mere imitator, the cutting-edge style that emerges is every bit his own. He breathes youth and driving energy into traditional country forms and adds a dash of big band horns, boogie woogie piano, scorching rockabilly beats, heavenly Hawaiian steel licks and some wigged-out hillbilly jazz guitar.

Hancock figures he started writing songs around the age of twelve, and he did a lot of travelling around Texas, playing juke joints and belting out his originals for anyone who'd listen. At 18, he won the "Wrangler Country Showdown" but couldn't claim the prize because he'd already enrolled in the Marines. After a six-year hitch with Uncle Sam, he moved to Austin, where he reacquainted himself with music and won a role in the 1994 theatrical production of Chippy. He performed alongside Terry Allen, Butch Hancock, Joe Ely and Robert Earl Keen and Rolling Stone proclaimed, "The nasal honky-tonk of newcomer Wayne Hancock practically steals the show."

In 1995 Wayne debuted with Thunderstorms and Neon Signs, a remarkable CD produced by steel guitar legend Lloyd Maines (Joe Ely, Wilco and Richard Buckner). The release was met with critical acclaim. Newsweek called it "the most promising debut of the season." Two-hundred-fifty dates throughout the country, including brilliant performances on Austin City Limits and NPR's Prairie Home Companion, led to well over 22,000 copies sold of his debut release on a tiny independent Texas label.

In 1997, Wayne signed with ARK 21, an eclectic and well-anchored label owned by former Police manager Miles Copeland. Miles and his staff were impressed with Wayne's genuine ability for writing and performing and have dubbed him "arguably the hardest-working man in show business" for his willingness to tour solidly and his insistence on efficiency and untainted live energy in the studio. That's What Daddy Wants, Hancock's sophomore release, was recorded in a startling three days. A brilliant example of his Texas swing and juke joint rockabilly, the album was even a staple on the space shuttle Columbia, the bugle call of its title track used to wake the astronauts. After That's What Daddy Wants generated even more critical success than the first release, ARK 21 decided to reissue Thunderstorms and Neon Signs on their label.

The past several years have been a time of personal evolution and growth in Wayne's life. He was self-managed since the beginning of 1998 and later that year he lost his father to cancer.He has still been gigging solidly throughout the country and has been doing his own driving, tour managing and taking care of business in exactly his own way.
Venue Information:
The Casbah - San Diego
2501 Kettner Blvd.
San Diego, CA, 92101
http://www.casbahmusic.com